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Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice / Indigenous Social Justice

Landmark report - First Nations women and girls

A landmark report on Australia’s First Nations women and girls has been released, with an ambitious, female-led plan for structural reform. 

Wiyi Yani U Thangani—(Women’s Voices)—Securing Our Rights, Securing Our Future Report 2020 is a comprehensive, whole-of-life document and the result of over a hundred engagements with thousands of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls of all ages in remote, very remote, regional and urban communities. 

Native Title Report 2021

Native title report 2021

To contribute to the Native Title Report 2021, please complete either or both of the survey and guided submission form

Effective approaches to prevention, diagnosis and support for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

Australian Human Rights Commission submission to the Senate Standing Committees on Community Affairs 

The Commission welcomes the opportunity to make comments to the Senate Standing Committee on Community Affairs in relation to its inquiry into effective approaches to prevention, diagnosis and support for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder.

Commission evidence to FASD Inquiry

The Australian Human Rights Commission is calling for the Australian Government to adopt community led responses informed by targeted investment in research, education, training, diagnosis and treatment to combat Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD).

The Commission yesterday gave evidence before the Senate Community Affairs References Committee's Inquiry into the effective approaches to prevention, diagnosis and support for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder.

Calls to end Indigenous deaths in custody

The Australian Human Rights Commission is shocked and saddened by the death in custody of Black American man, George Floyd and the violence that has since erupted in the United States of America.

The global focus on these events reminds Australians of the unacceptably high rates of incarceration and deaths in custody of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. 

This was brought into sharp focus yesterday when a police officer in Sydney injured an Indigenous teenager, prompting an internal police investigation. 

NILAC: National Indigenous Legal Advocacy Courses

Aboriginal flag flying in city
The NILAC courses were transferred to Tranby - the National Indigenous Adult Education and Training Centre. Contact Tranby for more information on these courses.

Learning from crisis

Six weeks ago I returned to my traditional homeland near Fitzroy Crossing in Western Australia. Thanks to modern technology, I am working remotely and continuing my duties as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner.

Like many Aboriginal people, I chose to return to Country because COVID-19 travel restrictions made homeland communities the safest place to see out the pandemic. As a mature Aboriginal woman, I am statistically at greater risk from COVID-19. It was important to follow the advice of health experts.

Time for action

By Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island Social Justice Commissioner, June Oscar.

On the ancient lands of the Anangu, dust settled and ink dried on a document that marked an extraordinary moment in Australia’s history. 

From all points of the southern sky, we gathered in the centre of the country we’ve called home for more than 60 thousand years, to endorse a statement that would pave the way for First Nations peoples to have a voice enshrined in the Constitution. 

Turning the Uluru Statement into action

On the ancient lands of the Anangu, dust settled and ink dried on a document that marked an extraordinary moment in Australia’s history. 

From all points of the southern sky, we gathered in the centre of the country we’ve called home for more than 60 thousand years, to endorse a statement that would pave the way for First Nations peoples to have a voice enshrined in the Constitution. 

A voice for us to participate on all matters that affect us. Matters that for so long, have been decided by others who think they know our lives better than we do: they do not. 

COVID-19's unexpected lessons

Six weeks ago I returned to my traditional homeland near Fitzroy Crossing in Western Australia.

Thanks to modern technology, I am working remotely and continuing my duties as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner.

Like many Aboriginal people, I chose to return to country because COVID-19 travel restrictions made homeland communities the safest place to see out the pandemic. As a mature Aboriginal woman, I am statistically at greater risk from COVID-19. It was important to follow the advice of health experts.