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Complaint Information Service

Sexual harassment at work is profoundly damaging and unfair

Gender rights are no joke. Australian law gives us all a legal right to live and work free from sexual harassment.

But where does behaviour that is inappropriate, disrespectful or just plain rude cross the line to become unlawful? This is a question the Australian Human Rights Commission has been working on for 30 years.

Preparing for Conciliation

Wednesday 15 April, 2015

 

 

Complaint information in Auslan

Wednesday 12 November, 2014

The Australian Human Rights Commission is an independent third party which investigates complaints about discrimination and breaches of human rights.

This presentation in Auslan explains what you can complain about and how the complaint process works. 

Watch Information about making a complaint

Information for New Zealanders living in Australia - FAQs

There are a significant number of New Zealanders living in Australia. The number of New Zealand citizens in Australia at 30 June 2012 was estimated as being 647 863.

As a result of a number of general inquiries received regarding the entitlements and rights of New Zealanders living in Australia, the Australian Human Rights Commission has developed these Frequently Asked Questions.

Complaints under the Sex Discrimination Act: Gender Identity

Monday 29 July, 2013

Complaints under the Sex Discrimination Act: Gender Identity

Complaints under the Sex Discrimination Act: Intersex Status

Monday 29 July, 2013

Complaints under the Sex Discrimination Act: Intersex Status

Information for advocates and lawyers participating in conciliation

Date

Casenote: Haraksin v Murrays Australia Ltd (No 2) [2013] FCA 217

Sexual harassment

The Commission is currently conducting the fourth national workplace sexual harassment survey, the results of which are due mid-2018.

Commission seeks to intervene in juvenile detention case

The Australian Human Rights Commission has been granted leave to intervene in proceedings in the Supreme Court of Western Australia in a matter concerning the transfer of children from the Banksia Hill Detention Centre to Hakea Prison.

This case seeks to challenge two decisions relating to the transfer. The first concerns the declaration that Hakea Prison is a detention centre for the purposes of the Young Offenders Act 1994 (WA). The second is the decision to transfer 73 children from Banksia Hill Juvenile Detention Centre to the adult facility, Hakea Prison in WA.