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Counter-Terrorism and Human Rights

Commission warns of ASIO Bill overreach

The Australian Human Rights Commission has called for a redraft of a new Bill to amend ASIO’s powers.

Iftar fundamentally repudiates violence and hatred

Speaking at an Iftar dinner hosted by the Victorian Parliament, Human Rights Commissioner Edward Santow has described Australia’s commitment to multiculturalism as “stronger than the fear of difference; stronger than hatred; stronger than violence.”

Commissioner Santow said Iftar dinners, held during the month of Ramadan, “fundamentally repudiate a worldview that glorifies violence and hatred.”

Victorian Parliament Iftar Dinner

Remarks of Edward Santow, Human Rights Commissioner to the 12th Annual Victorian Parliament Iftar Dinner

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Inquiry into the Counter-Terrorism Legislation Amendment Bill (No.1) 2015

Submission to Inquiry into the National Security Legislation Amendment Bill (No. 1) 2014

 

Inquiry into the National Security Legislation Amendment Bill (No. 1) 2014

Australian Human Rights Commission Submission to the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Intelligence And Security

21 August 2014

Judicial review of lawfulness of detention (2013)

Summary

The Australian Human Rights Commission provides this response to the questionnaire from the Working Group on Arbitrary Detention in relation to judicial review of the lawfulness of detention.

The Australian Human Rights Commission provides this response to the questionnaire from the Working Group on Arbitrary Detention in relation to judicial review of the lawfulness of detention.

Human Rights and the War against Terrorism (2003)

"A system of tyranny, the most galling, the most horrible, the most undisguised in all its parts and attributes that has stained the page of history or disgraced the annals of the world." British Prime Minister William Pitt, 10 November 1797, speech to the House of Commons concerning France under the government of the Directory.

No need to abandon human rights to be tough on terror (2006)

In the post-September 11 world, debate about counter-terrorism is often characterised as an argument between 'the realists', who appreciate the need for tough new counter-terrorism laws, and 'the out of touch', who fail to take the terrorist threat seriously.

Counter-terrorism and human rights

Counter-terrorism and human rights

Since the events in the United States on 11 September 2001, the Australian Government has introduced more than 40 new counter-terrorism laws. Amongst other things, these laws have created: