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Lessons

Lesson 1 What makes a community liveable for diverse groups of people?
Australian Curriculum links
ACHGK043 The factors that influence the decisions people make about where to live and their perceptions of the liveability of places
  • investigating students’ interpretations of the concept of liveability and choices about where to live, including considerations of a broad range of disabilities (physical, sensory, psychosocial and intellectual)

ACHGK046 The influence of social connectedness, community identity and perceptions of crime and safety on the liveability of places

  • discussing the different types of places where people can feel included or excluded, and evaluating how this affects perceptions about the liveability of places.
Integrated Teaching Learning and Assessment Resources
Pre-viewing/Scaffolding Activities
  • Conduct a picture difference activity to introduce the unit to students. Divide students into pairs. Provide one student with pictures labeled A (which shows buildings/services that are not accessible) whilst the other student has pictures labeled B (which contain accessible buildings/services). Students need to communicate with each other to figure out what is different about the ‘A’ pictures compared to the ‘B’ pictures. There are in total three pictures each for A & B.
    • Difference between pictures 1A and 1B: Unlike in picture 1A, there is an accessible toilet and the word ‘toilet’ is written in braille in picture 1B.
    • Difference between pictures 2A and 2B: The pictures show the services provided in train stations. The train station in picture 2B, unlike the train station in picture 2A, has a lift, ramp, and an accessible toilet, payphone and carspace.
    • Difference between pictures 3A and 3B: The pictures show the access to a café in Federation Square, Melbourne. Picture 3B shows the café in the square can be accessed via both a ramp and stairs, whereas picture 3A shows the café can only be accessed via stairs.
       
  • Draw the students’ attention back to the uncropped image of Federation Square in Melbourne, shown in picture 3B. Discuss with students how this public space has been designed to be accessible to all people. For example, the square uses both stairways and gentle slopes for ease of access; features accessible bathrooms and parking; and provides hearing loops in the main areas. Federation Square has also developed a Disability Action Plan to contribute to the ongoing improvement of its facilities and services. You can read about the Plan and the accessible services at the Federation Square website.
     
  • Students construct a definition of ‘liveability’ by considering the various facets of ‘liveability’ such as:
    • the ability of all individuals to have a political voice in the community;
    • employment opportunities for all residents
    • everyone’s access to built infrastructure (e.g. hospitals, schools, leisure facilities, telecommunications and transport networks)
    • ability of all residents to access social infrastructure (e.g. community organisations or clubs)
    • sustainable environmental practices
    • Access to technology.
       
  • Students are provided with the Activity sheet: Defining liveability. As a class, construct word circles for each of the included terms, and discuss the terms in the context of liveability (i.e. provide examples). Students could also create diagrams/graphics to represent each of the terms.
  • Students identify that the liveability of a community differs for different groups of people in the community based on their different needs.
    • Break the class into small groups. Assign each group a different demographic group such as older people, young people, families, people with disabilities and people without cars. Encourage students to identify specific features of liveability for their group and how this can increase social inclusion.
    • Conduct a jigsaw classroom activity to ensure all students identify the common and specific aspects of liveability for different groups. (For more information about the jigsaw activity view the Jigsaw Classroom website)

      Provide students with the Activity sheet: What makes a community liveable for different groups of people? The activity sheet will help structure the jigsaw activity. Discuss the importance of the community catering for the needs of diverse groups of people.

      Alternatively, create a class mind map on http://mindmeister.com/ to identify common and specific aspects of liveability for different groups.

Activity sheets: Picture difference (Pictures A and Pictures B)

Activity sheet: Defining liveability

Activity sheet: What makes a community liveable for different people?

 

 

Stella Young in a wheelchair out the front of a Topshop

Image Caption: Stella Young, Room for change,, 20 Year: 20 Stories

Lesson 2 Assessing the liveability of your local suburb
Australian Curriculum links
ACHGK043 The factors that influence the decisions people make about where to live and their perceptions of the liveability of places
  • comparing student access to and use of places and spaces in their local area and evaluating how this affects perceptions of liveability

ACHGK046 The influence of social connectedness, community identity and perceptions of crime and safety on the liveability of places

  • discussing the different types of places where people can feel included or excluded, and evaluating how this affects perceptions about the liveability of places.
Integrated Teaching Learning and Assessment Resources
  • Divide students into groups. Assign each group a different demographic, such as people with disabilities, people without cars, young people, older people and families.

    Students are shown a map of the suburb their school is located in. Each group is asked to identify the features and factors that make it a ‘liveable’ space for their particular demographic. Students need to consider proximity to public transport, fire station, access to roads, amenities etc. This could be done using Google Maps in Satellite and Street View modes. Students should also research the accessibility of social infrastructure in the suburb.

  • Students write a description or annotate a map of the suburb, providing details about access to public transport, amenities and services. Students assess how ‘liveable’ they think the area is for their assigned demographic by referring to accessibility and proximity of important services and features.

    Each group reports their assessment of the liveability of the area to the class.

    Extension: Students could produce a short PowerPoint presentation about the liveability of the suburb for their demographic, and provide suggestions on how to enhance the liveability of the community.

Google Maps or a physical map of local area

Extension: PowerPoint presentation

 

 

Woman (Dee) ordering at a deli

Image Caption: Dee at the deli. Dee’s Place, 20 Year: 20 Stories

Lesson 3 Disability rights and accessibility
Australian Curriculum links
ACHGK043 The factors that influence the decisions people make about where to live and their perceptions of the liveability of places
  • investigating students’ interpretations of the concept of liveability and choices about where to live, including considerations of a broad range of disabilities (physical, sensory, psychosocial and intellectual)

ACHGK046 The influence of social connectedness, community identity and perceptions of crime and safety on the liveability of places

  • investigating the extent to which people in their place are socially connected or socially isolated and its effect on liveability
  • discussing the different types of places where people can feel included or excluded, and evaluating how this affects perceptions about the liveability of places.
Integrated Teaching Learning and Assessment Resources
  • Explain to students that in this lesson and upcoming lessons, the focus will be on the human rights of people with disabilities and their inclusion and social connectedness.
  • As a class, discuss the term ‘disability’ and briefly discuss different types of disabilities e.g. physical, intellectual, sensory and physcosocial.

    Introduce the concept of disability rights. As a class, students brainstorm the rights of people with disabilities. Ensure students understand that people with disabilities have the same rights as people without disabilities.

  • Explain that the Disability Discrimination Act is a law that makes it illegal to discriminate against people with disabilities. This can improve the lives of people with disabilities so that their communities are more liveable and they feel more socially connected and less socially isolated.

    The term ‘discrimination’ needs to be discussed. In small groups, students can brainstorm examples of discrimination against people with disabilities. Groups can then report their examples to the class.

    Alternatively, the teacher can use hypothetical scenarios to ask students whether any of the characters are experiencing discrimination. For the activity, students could be provided with red and blue cards to express their views. If the students believe discrimination is occurring in the scenario, they hold up red cards; otherwise students hold up blue cards. Students will need to provide explanations for their answers.

    Extension: Discuss and differentiate between the terms ‘direct discrimination’ and ‘indirect discrimination'.

  • In pairs or as a class, students complete the Activity sheet: Disability Discrimination and Access to Premises. Ensure students understand the right to have access to premises used by the public.
     
  • Brainstorm what it means to feel socially connected – this can be done in small groups or as a class.
     
  • Introduce the concept that people with disabilities may face barriers to social connectedness, which can then affect the liveability of communities for people with disabilities. In small groups or as a class, students brainstorm examples of barriers that people with disabilities may face.

    To stimulate discussion, ask students to think about different groups of people living with disabilities: children with disabilities, women with disabilities, men with disabilities, older people with disabilities, people with disabilities living in rural and remote areas, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disabilities, people with disabilities from culturally and linguistically diverse background and people with disabilities from minority groups.

  • Also ask students to think about different types of disabilities and how people with those disabilities may experience a variety of barriers to inclusion and participation in community life.
     
  • There are three videos (Ramped up, Room for change and Dee’s Place), which address liveability and social inclusion for people with disabilities.

    Teachers can choose which video to show the class. Alternatively, students can be divided into groups. Each group chooses one video to view and complete related activities.

    • Ramped up – Explores Mark’s fight to improve liveability, and accessibility of shops, footpaths and services for people with disabilities.
       
    • Room for change – Explores Stella’s experience clothes shopping and her online advocacy for clothes shops to be accessible to people with disabilities. It also explores Madeleine’s advocacy to make fitting rooms more accessible for people with disabilities.
       
    • Dee’s Place – Explores Dee’s experience living independently in shared accommodation rather than in a group home. It also explores issues of inclusion and community.

Ramped up

Viewing activities

  • Introduce the video Ramped up and explain that it is about changing streets and shops to become more accessible for people with disabilities. Watch the Ramped up video. Students complete the questions on the Activity sheet: Ramped up after they view the video a second time.
     
  • Literacy activity: The language in this video is highly colloquial and may need scaffolding. For instance, at first, students watch the whole video to obtain a general idea of the context. Afterwards, the teacher can replay the video to focus more intensely on literacy. When a colloquial term is mentioned in the video, the teacher can pause it and provide students with the opportunity to predict the meaning of the term based on its context. Students, as a class or in small groups, can then develop word circles for each colloquial term.

    Examples of colloquial terms that may require explaining include ‘bug bears’, ‘fallen on my feet’, ‘fighting tooth and nail’ and the play on words in the title of the video.

Post-viewing activities

  • Using the viewing questions as a scaffold, facilitate a class or small group discussion about the liveability issues raised. Focus on:
    • the difficulties faced by people with disabilities in terms of accessibility and mobility
    • the impact this would have on people’s quality of life and sense of social connectedness
    • how limitations to accessibility might affect the decisions of people with disabilities about where to live and how to spend their time

Room for change

Viewing activities

  • Introduce the video Room for change. Explain how it is about Stella’s experience of having trouble physically accessing fashion shops to buy clothes and the action she took through social media to change the situation. The video also explores Madeleine’s advocacy to make fitting rooms more accessible for people with disabilities.
  • Students answer the viewing questions on the Activity sheet: Room for change after viewing the video for a second time.

Post-viewing activities

  • Using the viewing questions as a scaffold, facilitate a class or small group discussion about the liveability issues raised. Focus on:
    • the difficulties faced by people with disabilities in terms of accessibility and mobility
    • the impact this would have on people’s quality of life and sense of social connectedness
    • how limitations to accessibility might affect the decisions of people with disabilities about where to live and how to spend their time.

Dee’s Place

Viewing activities

  • Introduce the video Dee’s Place. Explain that it is about a woman with intellectual disabilities learning to live independently. Watch Dee’s Place.
  • Students answer the viewing questions on the Activity sheet: Dee’s Place after viewing the video for a second time.

Post-viewing activities

  • Using the viewing questions as a scaffold, facilitate a class or small group discussion about the liveability issues raised.

    Focus on:

    • the difficulties faced by people with disabilities in terms of living independently and living a full and inclusive life as part of a community
    • the impact this would have on people’s quality of life and sense of social connectedness
    • how a lack of accessible housing restricts or limits the choices and freedoms of people with disabilities.

Resource sheet: Hypothetical discrimination scenarios

Resource sheet/Activity sheet: Disability Discrimination Act and Access to Premises

Ramped up video
http://youtu.be/wzgoQDuioMY

Activity sheet: Ramped up

Room for change video
http://youtu.be/D3ErxMvdDPo

Activity sheet: Room for change

 

 

Dee exercising at the gym

Image Caption: Dee working hard at the gym. Dee’s Place, 20 Year: 20 Stories

Lesson 4 Assessing and improving the liveability of your school environment for people with disabilities
Australian Curriculum links
ACHGS047 The strategies used to enhance the liveability of places, especially for young people, including examples from Australia and Europe
  • developing a specific proposal to improve an aspect of the liveability of their place, taking into account the needs of diverse groups in the community, including people with disabilities
  • researching methods implemented in Australia to improve the liveability of a place, and evaluating their applicability to their own locality

ACHGS053 Present findings, arguments and ideas in a range of communication forms selected to suit a particular audience and purpose; using geographical terminology and digital technologies as appropriate

  • presenting a report, supported by graphic representations, to communicate a reasoned argument, for example, to propose actions to improve liveability of the school environment
Integrated Teaching Learning and Assessment Resources
  • Review key concepts, such as liveability, social connectedness and accessibility for people with a disability, raised in previous lessons. Briefly revise what makes a place liveable for students with disabilities.
  • Refer to the Resource sheet: Disability Discrimination Act and Access to Premises in the context of your own school environment.
    • In small groups or as a class, students discuss the Access to buildings and services guidelines and information.

      Students can be shown photographs from The good, bad and ugly: Design and construction access website for visual representations of the access guidelines. Provide students with blue cards (representing correct application of the building standards) and red cards (representing incorrect application of the building standards). Show students a photograph, and using the cards, students need to express whether the buildings/parts of a building in the photograph correctly apply the building standards to enhance accessibility for people with disabilities.

      Alternatively, divide students into groups. Provide each group a red and a blue card. Show students a photograph. In groups, students discuss whether the photograph illustrates the correct or incorrect design of buildings/parts. Using the coloured cards, groups report their decision to the class.
       

    • In pairs or small groups, students can complete the accessibility audit on the Activity sheet: How accessible is your school? Assess the school building/s’ accessibility for people with disabilities. Get students to consider people with a range of disabilities (e.g. physical, sensory, psychosocial, intellectual) who may have difficulty with accessing buildings, reading signs and navigating. Students research strategies that can be used to enhance the accessibility of the building/s and make recommendations on how to make your school more accessible.
       
    • In pairs or small groups, students develop a specific proposal of how to improve the liveability of the school environment for people with disabilities. Provide students with the Activity sheet: Proposal template to structure the task.

      Alternatively, provide students with a map or blueprint of the school. In pairs or small groups, students re-design the school to make it more accessible. Consider inviting the Principal, or representatives of the P&C, to come and listen to students’ suggestions in order to provide an authentic audience to motivate students.

Extension activity

  • Students choose a well-known landmark or building in their city or town, and assess its accessibility for people with disabilities. Students can write a letter/petition making recommendations for improvements. Students can support their argument using: general human rights principles, Access Guidelines, Disability (Access to Premises-Buildings) Standards (2010), Disability Discrimination Act and/or the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

    The teacher could invite a community member with disabilities to come to the class and provide advice on the students’ suggestions and recommendations. The letter/petition could then be submitted to the local council.

Disability Access to Premises-Buildings Standards (2010), Disability Discrimination Act

Access to buildings and services guidelines and information
https://humanrights.gov.au/our-work/disability-rights/disability-standards

The good, bad and ugly: Design and construction access
http://www.humanrights.gov.au/publications/good-bad-and-ugly-design-and-construction-access-0

Activity sheet: How accessible is your school?

Activity sheet: Proposal template

Map or blueprint of school

 

Lesson 5 Examine the importance of accessible transport
Australian Curriculum links
ACHGK043 The factors that influence the decisions people make about where to live and their perceptions of the liveability of places
  • investigating students’ interpretations of the concept of liveability and choices about where to live, including considerations of a broad range of disabilities (physical, sensory, psychosocial and intellectual)

ACHGK044 The influence of accessibility to services and facilities on the liveability of places

  • examining the role transport plays in people’s ability to access services and participate in the local area
Integrated Teaching Learning and Assessment Resources

Explore different issues around transport accessibility.

Buses

Access for All

Viewing activities

Introduce the video Access for all. Explain how it is about making public transport accessible for people with disabilities. Watch the video Access for All. Students answer the questions in the Activity sheet: access for all after viewing the video for a second time.

Post-viewing activities

Using the viewing questions as a scaffold, facilitate a class or small group discussion about the liveability issues raised. Focus on:

  • the difficulties faced by people with disabilities in terms of accessibility to public transport
  • the impact this would have on people’s quality of life and sense of social connectedness
  • how limitations to accessibility might affect the decisions of people with disabilities about where to live and how to spend their time.

Trains

Graeme Innes vs. Railcorp

Pre-viewing activities

  • In small groups, students brainstorm the difficulties of travelling on trains for people with disabilities. Get students to consider people with a variety of disabilities e.g. sensory, physical, intellectual and physcosocial.

Viewing activities

  • Students view the video Graeme Innes vs. Railcorp. Prior to viewing, explain to students that it is about the importance of having train announcements for people who are blind or have print disabilities.
  • Ask students to consider the benefits of better design to the wider community (e.g. train announcement may benefit those who can’t read or don’t read English well, those with certain intellectual disabilities, older people, or those who have fallen asleep.

Post-viewing activities

  • In small groups or as a class, students read the Sydney Morning Herald opinion piece Clear announcements cannot stay in RailCorp's too hard basket. Students then complete the Activity sheet: Clear announcements cannot stay in Railcorp’s too hard basket.
    • Literacy activity: The newspaper article is quite dense, and some students may have difficulty understanding some of the vocabulary and comprehending the text. In this case, the teacher should conduct a detailed reading of the newspaper article and provide students with the Literacy activity sheet to scaffold the reading experience.

      The Literacy activity sheet requires students to predict the meaning of the bold words as they read the article. Students need to record synonyms/definitions of the bold words in the accompanying brackets. Students also need to predict the meaning of cultural expressions depending upon the context, and subsequently answer the margin questions. If necessary, the teacher can show images of various words, such as ‘Railcorp’, ‘eisteddfod’, ‘Tigers (rugby league team)’, ‘white cane’, ‘PA equipment’ etc. This will help trigger students’ prior knowledge and/or provide visual representations of the text.

      The teacher should frequently paraphrase sentences/paragraphs. Alternatively, students in small groups or pairs paraphrase paragraphs to obtain a greater understanding of the text.

  • Using the Activity sheet: Clear announcements cannot stay in Railcorp’s too hard basket as a scaffold, facilitate a class or small group discussion about the liveability issues raised.
     
  • Focus on:
    • the difficulties faced by people with disabilities in terms of accessibility to public transport
    • the impact this would have on people’s quality of life and sense of social connectedness
    • how limitations in accessibility would affect the decisions of people with disabilities about where to live and how to spend their time.

Access for all video
http://youtu.be/HhFcwBBFvms

Activity sheet: Access for all Graeme Innes vs. Railcorp video
http://youtu.be/3svI4-cPpcc

Resource sheet: Sydney Morning Herald opinion piece Clear announcements cannot stay in RailCorp's too hard basket

Activity sheet: Clear announcements cannot stay in Railcorp’s too hard basket.

Literacy activity sheet: Clear announcements cannot stay in Railcorp’s too hard basket.