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Lessons

 

Shoe in starting block

Lesson 1 Introduction to discrimination
Australian Curriculum Links
ACPPS098 Critique behaviours and contextual factors that influence the health and wellbeing of their communities
  • analysing the implications of attitudes and behaviours such as prejudice, marginalisation, homophobia, discrimination, violence and harassment on individuals and communities, and proposing counter-measures to prevent these behaviours
Integrated Teaching Learning and Assessment Resources
Introduce the concept of discrimination. As a class, discuss the term ‘discrimination’ and the places where discrimination may occur. In small groups, students take part in a progressive brainstorm to come up with examples of different types of discrimination.
  • Divide students into groups. Each group has to write down all the forms of discrimination they can think of in 30 seconds. Then each group passes their sheet to the next group. Again each group gets another 30 seconds to add more on to the sheet in front of them. However, they are not allowed to double up answers, therefore it forces the group to read what the previous group wrote.
  • Students share the results of the brainstorm with the class. Compare students’ answers with the information provided in the Resource Sheet: What is discrimination?
  • Inform students the remainder of this lesson and upcoming lessons will be focusing on the participation of people with disabilities in the community and more specifically in sport.
  • Discuss the term ‘disability’ and briefly discuss different types of disabilities e.g. physical, intellectual, psychosocial and sensory.
  • Introduce the concept of ‘disability discrimination’.
    • Divide students into small groups. Ask students to identify the different types of discrimination that people with disabilities may face, and the impacts of discrimination (e.g. social isolation). Students can record key points on butcher’s paper. Students can share their ideas with the class at the end of the activity.
    • To stimulate discussion, encourage students to consider accessibility of services and premises for people with disabilities, opportunities for people with disabilities to participate in various activities such as sporting events, and the inclusion of people with disabilities in the community. Encourage students to think about people with different types of disabilities, children with disabilities, women with disabilities, men with disabilities, older people with disabilities, people with disabilities living in rural and remote areas, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disabilities, people with disabilities from culturally and linguistically diverse background and people with disabilties from minority groups.
  • Students participate in a KWL (what you already Know, Want to know and what you have Learnt) activity. Students write down what they already know about disabilities and what they would like to know (this encourages students to create goals). At the end of the unit students reflect on what they have learnt.
Resource sheet: What is discrimination? Butcher’s paper

 

Lesson 2 Disability rights in sport
Australian Curriculum Links
ACPPS089 Evaluate factors that shape our identities and analyse how individuals impact on the identities of others
  • analysing the role of family, friends and community in supporting an individual’s identities and proposing strategies to enhance their own and other’s wellbeing

ACPPS098 Critique behaviours and contextual factors that influence the health and wellbeing of their communities

  • analysing the implications of attitudes and behaviours such as prejudice, marginalisation, homophobia, discrimination, violence and harassment on individuals and communities, and proposing counter-measures to prevent these behaviours
Integrated Teaching Learning and Assessment Resources
Pre-viewing activities
  • Introduce the concept of ‘disability rights’. As a class or in small groups, students brainstorm the rights of people with disabilities. Facilitate a class discussion to ensure students understand that people with disabilities have the same rights as people without disabilities, including the right to participate in sporting and recreational activities. Ensure students also understand that the Disability Discrimination Act makes it illegal to discriminate against people with disabilities.
  • As a class, read and discuss the Resource sheet: Disability rights and sports. Raise issues such as barriers athletes with disabilities may face when competing in sporting events because of discrimination.
  • Literacy activity: Some students may find it difficult to understand some of the vocabulary in the resource sheet. Conduct a detailed reading of the resource sheet and provide students with the Literacy Activity sheet: Disability rights and sports to scaffold the reading experience. Students can predict the meaning of the key vocabulary highlighted depending upon the context. You may need to paraphrase paragraphs or sentences. Alternatively, in pairs or small groups, students could paraphrase the paragraphs.

Teacher’s Note: In the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities it is recognised that disability is an evolving concept and no fixed definition of disability is provided. This is illustrated by the fact that the Convention’s use of the terms ‘disability sports’, ‘mainstream sport’ and ‘disability specific sport’ are now considered somewhat outdated. ‘Inclusive sport’ is the preferred overarching term, however in order to be consistent with the language of the Convention, references to Convention terms are included in this resource. Viewing Activities

  • Introduce the video, Let me win. Explain to students it is about disability discrimination in sport and a school student, Sekou Kanneh, taking a stand to defend his human rights. Sekou is a sprinter who is deaf, and fights to have a flashing light to signal the start of the race.
  • Students watch the video a second time and answer the questions on the Activity sheet: Let me win.

Post-viewing Activities

  • Facilitate a class or small group discussion about disability discrimination using the Activity sheet: Let me win as a scaffold. Focus on the importance of equal opportunity and inclusion in sport.

Resource sheet: Disability rights and sports

Literacy activity sheet: Disability rights and sports

Let me win video (3min 14sec) http://youtu.be/8s2VhvivNpQ

Activity sheet: Let me win


 

Lesson 3 Understanding the role of the Australian Human Rights Commission
Australian Curriculum Links
ACPMP107 Reflect on how fair play and ethical behaviour can influence the outcomes of movement activities
  • discussing the role in promoting fairness and ethical behaviour in sport of organisations such as the Australian Human Rights Commission, Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority, sporting tribunals and the Court of Arbitration for Sport.
Integrated Teaching Learning and Assessment Resources
  • Introduce the Australian Human Rights Commission. Connect with the previous lesson by asking students if they remember who Sekou made a complaint to.
  • As a class, review the Resource sheet: Disability discrimination and making a complaint to the Australian Human Rights Commission. Discuss the role of the Commission in promoting fairness and ethical behaviour, and challenging discrimination. Discuss the way the complaint’s process works and ensure students understand that the Commission aims to resolve issues via the process of conciliation.
  • Students examine recent cases where the Australian Human Rights Commission was involved in resolving a discrimination complaint in a sporting environment.

    Divide students into groups. Assign each group a particular case study from the Activity sheet: Disability discrimination in sport – case studies. Each group gets the information about the respondent and the complainant in a case study (you will need to withhold information about the outcome). The task for students is to predict what they believe would have happened at the conciliation meeting and come up with a proposal to resolve the issue.

    Students report to the class about their discussion, and then compare their predicted outcome with the actual outcome of the conciliation meeting.

Resource sheet: Disability discrimination and making a complaint to the Australian Human Rights Commission

Activity sheet: Disability discrimination in sport – case studies.


 

Lesson 4 Making a complaint to the Australian Human Rights Commission
Australian Curriculum Links
ACPMP107 Reflect on how fair play and ethical behaviour can influence the outcomes of movement activities
  • discussing the role in promoting fairness and ethical behaviour in sport of organisations such as the Australian Human Rights Commission, Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority, sporting tribunals and the Court of Arbitration for Sport
Integrated Teaching Learning and Assessment Resources
  • In pairs or small groups, students create a mock complaint about discrimination and/or harassment and fill out the Activity sheet: Making a complaint to the Australian Human Rights Commission. The activity sheet has been adapted from the Australian Human Rights Commission’s complaint form (accessed at http://www.humanrights.gov.au/complaints/lodge-complaint)

    Students share their mock complaints with the class. Afterwards, facilitate a class discussion about the way these mock complaints could potentially be resolved.

    Inform students that a person can make a complaint on behalf of another person, contact details of the complainant and respondent need to be provided, and that the Commission does provide assistance to lodge a complaint.

Activity sheet: Making a complaint to the Australian Human Rights Commission

 

 

Lesson 5 Participation of people with disabilities in sport
Australian Curriculum Links
ACPPS098 Critique behaviours and contextual factors that influence the health and wellbeing of their communities
  • analysing the implications of attitudes and behaviours such as prejudice, marginalisation, homophobia, discrimination, violence and harassment on individuals and communities, and proposing counter-measures to prevent these behaviours

ACPMP104 Examine the role physical activity, outdoor recreation and sport play in the lives of Australians and investigate how this has changed over time

  • investigating the varied perspectives held by Australians on sport and examining how this diversity is represented in the sports we play today
  • researching the trends in participation in organised disability sports and predicting future trends and directions
Integrated Teaching Learning and Assessment Resources
  • Students learn about how participation in sports by people with disabilities has changed over time.

    In small groups, pairs or individually, students develop a newspaper article about:

  • a particular sport with the aim of finding out how people with disabilities have been included or excluded from that sport over time, or
  • how the Paralympics have helped overcome discrimination against athletes with disabilities, or
  • an athlete with disabilities who has overcome discrimination e.g. Kurt Fearnley

    Provide students with the Activity sheet: Newspaper article template to guide students with the writing process. Depending upon the literacy levels of the students, this task may need to be scaffolded carefully. Suggestions for scaffolding include:

  • Explain the purpose of the newspaper article.
  • Provide students with an example of a newspaper article. In small groups, students identify the language features and structure of this text type using the newspaper article example provided.
  • Prior to students writing the article, as a class or in small groups, students brainstorm subject specific words and linking words that may be included in the article.
  • Work with students to jointly write the introduction and a paragraph of the newspaper article. In pairs or small groups, students could then aim to finish writing the article.
Activity sheet: Newspaper article template

See Australian Paralympic Committee athlete profiles http://www.paralympic.org.au/athletes

For examples of newspaper articles, see:
Sydney Morning Herald http://www.smh.com.au/
The Australian
http://www.theaustralian.com.au/


 

 

Lesson 6 Playing modified sports
Australian Curriculum Links
ACPMP099 Perform and refine specialised movement skills in challenging movement situations
  • performing specialised movement skills in situations where the rules or conditions have been modified to vary complexity
  • adapting and responding to changes in equipment that increase the complexity of a movement task or performance
  • transferring skills learnt in one movement situation to a different situation
Integrated Teaching Learning and Assessment Resources
  •  
  • As a class, students design a sport that is accessible for people with disabilities (e.g. modified basketball, football, goalball) by altering the rules and the scoring system of the sport. For instance, students could play on their knees using kneepads, play using only one hand, play blindfolded, play without hearing etc.

    Ensure there is time at the end of the game to provide students with the opportunity to debrief about their experience. The following questions could be used to guide the discussion:

  • How did modifying the rules and scoring system contribute to fair play?
  • Do you think it made the game more inclusive?
  • How did modifying the game change your body control and coordination?
  • What are some of the challenges of playing the modified game?
  • Do you think the modified version of the sport is as challenging as the original?
Regular sports equipment

Specialised sports equipment e.g. blindfolds, hearing blockers, goalball

Wheelchairs for wheelchair basketball

See organisations :
Wheelchair sports NSW http://wsnsw.org.au/roadshow/school-road-show/
Australian Sports Commission http://www.ausport.gov.au/participating/coaches/tools/coaching_specific_groups/Inclusive