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RightsED: Tackling sexual harassment - Activity sheet: Thinking about your own school

Tackling sexual harassment

Activity sheet: Thinking about your own school

It's time to have a look at your own school and see what the situation is. You may
find that there is no problem at your school - that would be great. Or you may find
that there are just a few isolated instances that need to be dealt with.

So, here are some questions to help you carry out a thorough and effective
evaluation of types of behaviour at your school.

When boys are together and a girl walks by, how do the boys respond?
How does the girl?

 

 

When girls are together and a boy walks by, how do the girls respond?
How does the boy?

 

 

 

What behaviour is teasing - and when does it become bullying?

 

 

 

What behaviour is flirting - and when does it become harassment?

 

 

Are there particular places where harassment occurs - in the classroom, or the
corridors, or the yard, or the sports area?

 

 

How do boys talk about girls when they are just with other boys?
What happens when there are teachers around?

 

 

How do girls talk about boys when they are just with other girls?
What happens when there are teachers around?

 

 

Are there places where there is graffiti that amounts to sexual
harassment?
How does the school respond?

 

 

Is sexual harassment discussed in your school?
Is there a school policy on it?
Are there special school practices to address it?

 

 

 

Note: When you are recording your observations you need to keep
details. But do not specifically name any people involved ('Jai harassed Katrina') but
use descriptors such as 'a Year 10 boy tried to flip up the skirt of a Year 8 girl
outside the girls' toilets'.

Responding to your findings

Your findings should identify what behaviour goes on, draw conclusions about the
degree to which a problem exists and make some suggestions about what could be done
about it in your school - such as posters, newsletters, or publicising the school
policy. You could share your evaluation with your school's SRC or the principal through
the SRC. You may be able to make a real difference!